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How to Stop Worrying About Money

Do you worry about money? Are you sick and tired of being sick of tired of worrying about money? What does worrying accomplish? What is the pay off you get from the worry? I have this theory that worry is the same as guilt in that if we worry enough, we subconsciously feel that we have done all we can do about the situation. In order words we don’t have to accept responsibility for the situation or our attitude about the situation - if we worry. Living with worry, like living with guilt is self-mutilation. “If I flog myself enough (by worrying or feeling guilty) then everyone will see that I have suffered over this situation. And that lets me off the hook so that I don’t HAVE to really get busy and change my beliefs, my behaviors, my habits, my thought patterns or my spending/saving patterns.” Is any of this ringing true for you?

What might happen if you took an honest look at yourself, became aware of what worry is doing to you and FOR you and make a decision to change your reactions and attitudes around money? I had a client tell me recently that she felt out of control when it came to money because she didn’t understand it, didn’t know how to safeguard it, and didn’t know how to replace it. That statement stopped me dead in my tracks. Wow was she being honest! Below are some tips for shifting from worry to peace.

  1. Be honest with yourself. Are you out of control? Are you over spending, under saving, are you about to lose your job? Or…… are you merely awful-izing (over reacting/dramatizing)?

  2. Learn what you can. Worry is caused by fear and most fear is caused by lack of knowledge or education. Learn about yourself, learn about money, invest with people you trust, and take responsibility for your money.

  3. Give generously. Keep money flowing. Money is a form of energy. If you hoard it, hang onto it, are reluctant to pay your bills until the last minute or pay them from a feeling/place of scarcity, you are ‘clogging the drains’. Give the waitress the extra dollar. If you have a service, give it as a gift. Contribute to your favorite charity. Mail $5 to someone whose address you pick out of the phone book. Giving does not mean being irresponsible.

  4. Give up your attachment to outcomes and possessions. Being non-attached creates emotional freedom — emotional freedom attracts abundance. Attachments attract fear; fear gets in the way of abundance. NOT worrying helps you stay focused and on purpose.

  5. Respect yourself and respect your money by paying yourself first — even some small amount.

  6. Trust. The best way to do this is stay focused in the present moment. Plan for the future then bring your attention back to the present. Give your full attention to the present and whatever task you are presently involved with. This attention gives you a kind of ‘passive passion’, which in turn breeds creatively and possibility.

  7. Hang out with the “Uppies”. Hang out with prosperous and positive thinking people. There is a saying: You can either make excuses or you can make money, but not both. Those who complain, are negative, the ‘poor me’s’ of the world live in and from fear. Stay away.

  8. Don’t focus on the problems. Take an objective look at the situation, brainstorm for solutions, determine the necessary steps and then let go of the situation. Just take the determined steps, expecting the best outcome and move on from the problem.

  9. Take good care of yourself. When you get tired, cranky, depressed — you worry. You take everything personally; you compare yourself, your bank account, and your success to others. When your spirits are high, you think differently, act differently and see possibility rather than scarcity. Notice you are beginning to feel drained and stop, take a break, take care of yourself!

  10. Look back on all the things you’ve worried about that never came to pass. All that energy wasted! What a kick in the butt (yours)!

Copyright 2002. Judy Irving, all rights reserved. judy@MovingOn.net 702-240-1866


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