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MOVING ON...to Endless Referrals

Most of us in business would love to have an endless supply of referrals so that we can stop thinking about marketing ourselves and just get on with the business of being ourselves and doing the business we love to do, right?. In other words doing exactly the opposite of what The E-Myth told us to do which was to work "On" our business as much as we work "IN" our business. The only way we can ever do that is to work "ON" the business until we reach the point of having endless referrals.

I recently attended a seminar given by author, Bob Burg, based on his book Endless Referrals and thought I would share with you some of the highlights of that seminar. Of course, you'll get more bang for your buck if you follow up by reading the actual book, but here's a start.

All things being equal people will do business with and refer to those we know, like and trust. So creating the relationship is first and foremost. We all know those people who call and launch into their selling mode or who walk up to us at a cocktail party or networking party and press their business card into our hand.....it's all about THEM....and how much do we care? Usually none, zip, and more zip.

Networking is about cultivating mutually-beneficial, give-and-take, win-win relationships. It's a two way street!

Each of us has a personal sphere of influence of about 250 people and so does each person we meet. Hence the term 'net', we all have a net around us, this net supports us (think Verizion) and we can share that net with each other. IF we take the time to learn about and cultivate the relationship so that we truly understand what the other does, who they are looking for, and then think about who we know that could benefit from knowing about that person and/or product. We expand the network of all concerned (build relationships) and build business.

When attending a networking function Burg suggests you plan on connecting with only a limited number of people and you focus on asking questions. Asking questions IS selling.

  1. Plan to connect with only 4-6 people.
  2. First get the layout of the room.
  3. Introduce yourself to 'a leader/center of influence'. The way to find this person is to notice small groups of 3-4. Who appears to be the leader, the one others are congregated around?
  4. Make gentle eye contact with this person.
  5. When available, introduce yourself and ask what he (she) does. When asked, only give your name and company, then put the attention back on him.
  6. Ask feel-good questions. How did you get started in the business? What do you most enjoy about you do? Perhaps ask about family, recreation, his message....(see # 7)
  7. After the rapport has been established, ask: "How can I know if someone I'm talking to would be a good prospect for you?"
  8. Ask for his card....don't plan on him doing anything with your card, even if he asks for it.
  9. Then move on to the other 4-5 people you'd like to connect with.
  10. After meeting them all, go back to # 1 and # 2. Seek them out in the group (over the buffet or whatever) and make eye contact again and call them by name. No further discussion.
  11. When you get back to your office, follow up with a note. This note is one you've had created on 70# bond, cut to fit into a standard #10 envelope with your logo, contact info, etc. I've even put my photo on mine. Write the note in blue ink and mail the same day saying something to the effect:

Dear____:

It was pleasure meeting you.

If I can refer business to you, I certainly will.

Best wishes,

_______________

What you have done here is keep the focus on them, it's not about you. In offering to be on their team, work for them, you are creating the relationship. A relationship where they will like you, morel ikely to trust you and refer business to you. Remember we all like people who like us and want to send business our way.

Here's wishing you happy-relationship building and endless referrals!

Talk to you again, soon.

Judy


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